Tag Archives: venice

Graffiti Artwork in Progress in Venice

On Tuesday, we spied this beautiful work-in-progress graffiti art on the side of the Davy Jones Liquor Locker, a famously no-frills liquor store in Venice, Los Angeles. We’ll go back to see the completed work in a few days and post pix here, but judging from what we see, there’s a local beach theme with palm trees and summery, sunny colors on the “wild style” lettering. Even in its half-finished state, the artwork is beautiful. This spot has been a canvas for a lot of other commisioned graffit art and street art over the years.

Crisp Street Art

Epic new artwork by Crisp on a fence in the alley behind Abbot Kinney Blvd. in Venice, Los Angeles. There’s a series of large-format street art pieces along this back-alley fence. Each segment of the fence has an indivudual artwork. What’s unusual about these is that the artwork itself is on a tarp-like material sized and tied to the sgement of chainlink fence. You can find these on the block between Santa Clara and California avenues.

What Would Kanye Think?

WWKT? What would Kanye think? We’ve recently been seeing a lot of these wheat-pasted WWKT posters around town. The one pictured here was on construction hoarding along Abbott Kinney Blvd. in Venice, in Los Angeles. The question is In the vein of “What would Jesus do?” In this case, it’s Yeezus.

So what If we actually take the question posed in this hilarious poster seriously and spend a few minutes ruminating on it, what might out answer(s) be?  What would Kanye think?

First, with regards to the poster and question itself, Kanye being Kanye, he’d probably have something to say about it for the sake of saying something about it and the chance to get some attention. Otherwise, he couldn’t care less. He wouldn’y think about it all. Maybe he’d feel flattered. A mild ego stroke.

WWKT about Donald Trump? He’d think Trump was great and, had he voted, would have voted for Trump. But Yeezus didn’t vote election day.

All the many things that one might want to know what Kanye is thinking about … Well, it’s endless.

WWKT about Greek yogurt? WWKT about the news Star Wars film, Rogue One? WWKT about getting for Kim Xmas present? WWKT the latest song by the Chainsmokers? WWKT about bicycle lanes? About who will win the Super Bowl? About climate change? About cilantro? Charter schools? Solange?  The Electoral College? Brexit? 

Monrow at Dusk

The clothing brand Monrow will soon be opening a retail concept store in this tiny, old California-style bungalow near Venice Beach in Los Angeles. As standard retail practice, the windows of the house-turned-shop are covered with paper to provide privacy while the final interior build-out is being completed. The Monrow signage is up and the lights are on, so the brand has announced itself in the neighborhood. It will be interesting to see what the company does with the space.

. . .

ここにファッションブランドのモンローの新しいショップがあります。 この店は、ロサンゼルスのヴェネツィア近所の古い家を占有しています。

Muhammad Ali Mural

This powerful street art mural in Venice, Los Angeles depicts late boxing legend Muhamed Ali. The image is based on a photo of Ali and references the famous 1974 “Rumble in the Jungle” boxing match he fought. The match was held in Zaire (now Congo), where local supporters cheered Ali with the Lingala phrase “Ali bomaye!” which is written on the wall in red paint.

. . .

この壁画は、有名なボクサー、ムハメド・アリを描いています。 アートワークはロサンゼルスのヴェネツィア地区にあります。

“I Wanna Bone”

Pictured here is another mural by the artist Jules Muck (a.k.a., “Muckrock”), who’s street art is associated with Venice Beach and can be found all around this famed Los Angeles beach neighborhood. The mural depicts a dog and a comic-book thought bubble with the statement “I wanna bone,” where the bone is visually represented by a cartoon-style bone.

On the Scene at Menotti’s Coffee Shop in Venice

The cafe at Menotti’s Coffee is a third-wave espresso joint and a friendly little hub for the legion of caffeinated locals and a certain stylish subset of Silicon Beach worker bees in the heart of Venice in Los Angeles. The baristas are serious about their coffee game but with zero pretension, in spite of the smattering of hipster accoutrements. Sure, there’s a skateboard and fixed-gear bicycle propped against a wall inside the cafe, and there’s beautiful, curated art photography on the wall, but its presence seems more a natural byproduct of taste than strategic. Across from the cafeteria is the famous, epic-scaled Venice “Touch of Evil” mural. On a slow day, we’ll cruise over to Menotti’s on our bikes for a long break and a flat white cappuccino.

Menotti’s Coffeeはロサンゼルスのヴェネツィアで “Silicon Beach”で働くスタイリッシュな若者やカフェ、親しみやすい小さなエスプレッソバーです。 カフェバリスタはコーヒーについて真剣です。 彼らにはプレテンションはありません。 しかし、彼らはヒップスターです。 もちろん、カフェの中にはスケートボードと固定式の自転車があります。 壁に美しくキュートな芸術的な写真があります。 これはメノッティスタイルの例です。 カフェの通りを渡って、有名な、壮大なサイズのヴェネツィア「Touch of Evil」の壁画があります。 私たちが忙しくないとき、仕事から休みを取って、メノッティに自転車を乗せて、美味しいフラットホワイトのカプチーノを飲むことにします。

“Cold Open”

This beautiful old-school graffiti art is on a corrugated metal fence next to the Venice Beach offices of an advertising agency called Cold Open. Check out this short time-lapse video documenting the painting of this graffiti artwork.

“The Emperor of Hemp”

This photo-realistic mural of the late Jack Herer is by artist Brian Garcia (a.k.a., TAZROC). You can find it at 1501 Pacific Avenue in Venice Beach, Los Angeles. Herer was a well-known activist and book author advocating for the legalization of marijuana who was sometimes referred to as “the Emperor of Hemp.” The mural is on a building that at the time it was painted was occupied by the Nile Collective, a cannabis clinic that has since moved to the beach town of Playa del Rey a few miles south.

Highly Successful Beach Bum



We have a hunch that the message in this typographic garage-door mural by artist Adam Mars may be an accurate description of the person residing in this Venice Beach home. Using our powers of imagination, we picture this “highly successful beach bum” as a man in his early forties,  with tousled, shoulder-length hair, perhaps with bleached-out blonde streaks (from spending all that time at the beach), a thin unkempt beard, feet clad in either Havaianas flip-flops or lace-up Van’s and a natural, medium-bronze tan. In his garage is either a vintage Porsche 912b in need of maintenance or a beat-up Land Rover Defender in need of a wash.

“Eyes, Mouth, Body, Feet …” Street Art … Venice, Los Angeles

This hilarious wheat-paste street art on an old clapboard bungalow in Venice looks like a child’s Crayola drawing of a human body. Or is it a robot? No matter. Various parts of the body are called out: Eyes, mouth, hands, etc. Which reminds us of a children’s educational song, the kind use to teach kids in pre-school. But we think an adult may have had a hand in the creation of this artwork (aside from illegally posting it) because where logic would suggest the word “butt” it instead says “shit.”

“Screamface” Graffiti …Venice, Los Angeles

This crudely painted “Screamface”graffiti  is on a sign behind a gas station at the intersection of Lincoln and Venice boulevards in Venice. It cries for attention, but without any visually relevant context or messaging its meaning is a mystery and can only be speculated. In other words: Who the fuck is Screamface? (Is it even a “someone”?) Why do we care? Graffiti, even as plain as this, and with relative anonymity has a history. In New York City, this style could be seen often. The graffiti writers and artists “Rambo” and “Neckface” scrawled their names in large crude letters on massive billboards around the city and around the world for years. Only a few knew what it meant and who was behind it. It’s just a moniker. But the word “scream” and “face” apart or combined conjure evocative, emotional notions for the viewer, perhaps, an idea of rage. But the Why is a mystery.

Stripes Collage Street Art … Venice, Los Angeles 

We love this type of street art, the kind that takes a mundane, boring piece of “street furniture” — in this case an  electrical utility box — and uses it as canvas for something aesthetically interesting, beautiful and evocative. This painting in Venice, in Los Angeles, uses elements of collage, illustration, graphic design and fashion, as well as a liberal use of striped patterns, to create a bold and fresh interruption of suburban visual landscape.

Wild Style Graffiti Truck … Venice, Los Angeles

When we saw this graffiti truck in Los Angeles a couple of days ago, we were for a hot sec transported back to downtown New York City, where such trucks are everywhere. The elaborate artwork on this truck reminds us of the classic “wild style” graffiti art that emerged alongside early hip-hop culture in NYC. While seeing graffiti art like this in LA is not unusual at all, it’s not as common as it is New York, where this blog was founded and where we lived for 15 years. The sight of this truck parked off fashionable Abbot Kinney Blvd. in Venice gave us a moment of cognitive dissonance.

Mural of Palm Trees by Noah Abrams … Venice, Los Angeles

image1-2

This beautiful black-and-white photo-realistic mural of palm trees silhouetted is a new addition to the street art scenery along Abbot Kinney Blvd. in Venice, Los Angeles. Created by Noah Abrams Studio, the mural includes a single, tall palm tree trunk that if viewed from a certain angle lines up perfectly with an actual palm tree in the background. Clever.

Mural Portrait of Chinese Artist Ai Wei Wei … Venice, Los Angeles 

The controversial Chinese artist and activist Ai Wei Wei is depicted in this new mural along Abbot Kinney Blvd. in Venice, Los Angeles. (See other related posts on Ai Wei Wei.) Rendered in a style like a pencil illustration, the artist appears serious and pensive, as though he’s staring past you into the middle distance. Wei Wei’s head appears to float in the space of the white-painted brick wall, disembodied, iconic and alone.

“Selfie This” Street Art Poster … Venice, Los Angeles

The cheeky message of this wheatpaste street art posted on a back-alley dumpster is unequivocal. Using a graphical, copy-paste collage style, the poster could be interpreted as form of commentary on the inherent narcissim of self-photography and image-making that is a by-product of social media. “Selfie This” offers a middle-fingered salute as hilarious insult, a visual offense that can be used for ironic, humorous effect by anybody taking a selfie with this poster. Which was probably the point. Look for it in the alley behind the restaurant Gjelina on Abbot Kinney Blvd in Venice, is Los Angeles.