American street artist DFace artwork often works with iconic pop-cultural imagery, often American retro-comic book styles and skeletal graphics. Here in Tokyo he’s de-constructed a Japanese icon, “Kitty -chan,” better know around the world as “Hello Kitty,” revealing her skull.   

We found these cute, simple wheat-pasted street art graphics on a utility box near the Watari Museum (Watarium) Ura-Harajuku in Tokyo.

American artist Curtis Kulig’s cursive “Love me” graffiti message is a global street art icon, a viral, real-world visual meme that universally resonates. We’ve seen it everywhere and in some unusual places — from NYC to Amsterdam, Brooklyn to Tokyo — in the form of spray-painted graffiti, brush-painted murals and,Continue Reading

This is the front of the Watari Museum of Comtemporary Art  in Shibuya, in Tokyo, where French street artist superstar JR recently revisited with his well-publicized posters of faces of people from Japan’s Tohoku region. Tohoku was the scene of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster happened following the 2011 earthquakeContinue Reading

Since the the 2011 reactor-meltdown disaster at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan, we’ve seen a lot of anti-nuke street art pop up in Tokyo, especially around Shibuya and Naka-Meguro. Often the artwork is in the form of a large sticker that features the line-drawing image of a littleContinue Reading

This graphic on a wall in Shibuya, in Tokyo, looks and feels like a piece of street art and could have been created by stencil, paint-print, heat transfer or painted by hand. It may be graphical logo for a restaurant or company brand mark. Whatever it is, we think it’sContinue Reading