The wheat-paste street art of artist “Bunny M” depicts a mysterious mythical humanoid that reads at a glance like an artifact of dark, foreboding Japanese manga┬ácomic book illustration enshrined on the brick and stone walls of lower Manhattan and Brooklyn. Pictured here is one in Nolita in downtown New YorkContinue Reading

Fresh street art by artist Calen Blake on the old Bowery Bank building, a.k.a., the Jay Maisel Building, at the corner of Bowery and Spring streets in New York’s Lower East Side. This wheat-paste artwork is yet another portrait of a woman with an intriguing body of hair — it’sContinue Reading

This #ELLEThugLife street art paste-up at the old Bowery Bank Building (a.k.a., the Jay Maisel Building) in downtown New York is filled with diverse religious symbolism and compelling imagery. It depicts a naked woman wearing only a head-scarf and partial face veil and sporting many tattoos as she stares directlyContinue Reading

One of artist Bradley Theodore’s recent street art additions to the downtown New York CIty landscape is this diminutive full-body skeletal portrait of fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld and his Birman cat Choupette. The iconic Lagerfeld, currently serving as creative director for Chanel, has made many public appearances with Choupette thatContinue Reading

“Monsieur ‘A’” (a.k.a., “Mr. ‘A’) by the Paris-based Swedish-Portuguese street-art pioneer Andre makes a long overdue appearance in downtown New York City upon a construction hoarding covering a storefront on Lafayette Street in SoHo. Welcome back to New York, Andre!

New street from the always awesome A.S.V.P. at the site of the former Pulino’s restaurant on Houston Street near southwest corner of intersection with Bowery, across from the Bowery Wall, a.k.a., the Deitch Wall.

This wheat-paste street art (or “wheatie”) of a super cute, larger-than-life baby face by artist “Mactrukk” has been popping up around New York City lately, including at a spot on the famous graffiti-covered former bank building owned and inhabited by photographer Jay Maisel at the corner on Spring Street andContinue Reading