Tag Archives: lalaland

Cat Stencil Street Art … Malibu, Los Angeles

Along Pacific Coast Highway, across from famed Malibu Beach and its iconic pier, is this amusing life-size stencil street art of a cat’s silhouette on a brick wall. The feline is depicted in mid-stride at sidewalk level as if casually padding down the pavement in search of the next meal. Next to the cat is the stenciled message “only fools litter.”

Plain Minimalist All-White Leather Sneakers … Venice, Los Angeles

We recently popped into the Rag & Bone store on Abbot Kinney Blvd. in Venice, in Los Angeles, to try on this paired of white leather sneakers. These shoes are as plain and minimalist as can be. We love ’em.

“Venice Dennis” Stencil Street Art … Venice, Los Angeles

This large stencil street art mural on a fence in Venice, in Los Angeles, depicts the late actor-artist Dennis Hopper as he appeared in the film “Apocalypse Now.” Hopper was a resident of Venice Beach, his home just a few blocks away from the location of this artwork.

Street Art by Shepard Fairey on PCH …Santa Monica, Los Angeles

We spotted some new street art from artist Shepard Fairey in an unusual spot last week. Along Pacific Coast Highway, under the towering bluffs of north Santa Monica, there’s an abandoned, partially destroyed retaining wall where two new black-and-white graphic posters had been wheat-pasted. One poster is of draped triangle of the American flag. The other is a classic “Andre” Obey poster.

“Love” by DFace … West Adams, Los Angeles

Alongside Interstate 10, otherwise known at the Santa Monica Freeway, there’s a massive mural by street-art star DFace on the side of a multi-storied parking structure in the West Adams area near Downtown Los Angeles.

Tattered “Vegan Club” Poster … Silver Lake, Los Angeles

Here’s another one of those Vegan Club wheat-pasted street art posters that have been popping up all over Los Angeles and New York. The posters have a guerla-marketing quality and are usually two-toned single color prints of a pop-cultural icon rendered in high-contrast. The one pictured here is on a utility box on the pavement off Sunset Blvd. in Silver Lake, in Los Angeles. There seem to be tons of these in Silver Lake and neighboring  Echo Park.

“Muck Saves” Street Art by Jules Muck … Venice, Los Angeles

It seems like on just about every block and around every corner in Venice’s clashed-up grid of narrow streets and alleys, there’s a piece of street art by artist Jules Muck. His awesome corpus of public artwork is both literally and figuratively part of the Venice landscape, as much a part of this confused suburban costal paradise as its famous beach boardwalk. “Muck Saves” is a Christ-like portrait and play on the evangelical bumper-sticker phrase “Jesus Saves.” One could argue that Muck’s art is “saving” Venice. But from what? The tide of gentrification? That urban-renewal process inspired by association with Venice’s edgy patina and legacy of gritty charms. A process that’s simultaneously forever sanding away those gritty edges with the moneyed tastes of the arrivistes? Yes and no. Places change, evolve, grow. It can’t be “saved” any more that it can not be saved. Muck’s work is just a beautiful part of an already beautiful landscape.

Street Art Covered Sections of Berlin Wall … Miracle Mile, Los Angeles

Sections of the Berlin Wall covered with mural and street art (pictured below) have been put on display in the forecourt exhibition space of the Spruth Magers art gallery in Los Angeles. The gallery and wall face Wilshire Boulevard and sit across from LACMA in the Miracle Mile area of the city.

Two slabs of the wall display a mural depicting late U.S. presidents Kennedy and Reagan, both of whom famously gave speeches at in Berlin when the German capital was divided by the wall.

This exhibit is symbolic in several ways and notably for Spruth Magers since it is a Berlin-based art gallery. Spruth recently opened its LA outpost, its second after setting up a gallery in London. It will open up a space in Hong Kong in May.

The Binoculars Building … Venice, Los Angeles

The whimsical Binoculars Building — pictured below — on a quiet, mostly residential stretch of Main Street in Venice, in Los Angeles, was designed by architect Frank Gehry back in the 1980s.

It’s a local landmark and Gehry’s last building to be constructed in Los Angeles until the development of the Walt Disney Concert Hall two decades later.

In the interim, Gehry created the Guggenheim Bilbao and became one of the world’s foremost “starchitects” if not its greatest living architect.

The Binoculars Building was initially the home to the legendary advertising agency Chiat/Day (now TBWA/Chiat/Day), which grew too big for the space years later and vacated for much larger offices in nearby Playa Vista.

Since then, the building  complex has been home to many creative tenants including Google. The giant binoculars, by the way, are by the artists Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen.

It’s still surprising that the building is not more widely known.