Tag Archives: installation art

The Electrifying Installations of Artist Jason Rhoades

We’re posting a few pix here from the sprawling and electrifying “Jason Rhoades Installations, 1994-2006” exhibition at the massive Hauser & Wirth gallery in the Arts District near downtown Los Angeles. We visited this retrospective of Rhoades work last weekend and were blown away by his darkly beautiful and daring art installations. If you have time and are in L.A., we can’t highly recommend enough that you see this show.

 

Skull of Converse

This decorative installation artwork at the Converse concept store in Santa Monica, in Los Angeles, is a spooky and clever visual conceit. At a distance and without the context of the store, the viewer would likely be unable to perceive that the artwork is comprised of hundreds of Converse sneakers in various monochromatic shades. Up close, the viewer might fail to perceive that the composition of the sneakers forms a creepy human skull-like image. It’s briliant, if a little dark, but edgy and totally “on brand” for the fashion shoe company.

What is Miracle Mile?

We never tire of revisiting this minimalist masterpiece by artist Robert Irwin at LACMA in Los Angeles. The colorful installation of fluorescent lights has a permanent home in a large ground-floor gallery at LACMA’s Broad Contemporary building. The title of the artwork is “Miracle Mile” and it is specific to its location. ¬†

The museum is on Wilshire Blvd. at the heart of an area named Miracle Mile, which was originally planned as an alternative urban district to Downtown LA in the 1920s. Wilshire eventually became one of LA’s main east-west traffic and business corridors and the “mile” area has since become a kind of “museum row” for the number of other large galleries and museums nearby.

Irwin’s artwork, in its length, geometry and brightly illuminated presence, is a visual metaphor for the commercial strip and aptly is displayed on a wall that faces and runs parallel to Wilshire Blvd itself. A long floor-to-ceiling window in size and proportion similar to the artwork separates the gallery from the boulevard and makes “Miracle Mile” a kind of symbolic mirror.

On the Scene … Viewing “Penetrable” by Artist Jesus Raphael Soto at LACMA, Los Angeles

The late Paris-based Venezuelan artist Jesus Raphael Soto made a career of painting, sculpture and optical and kinetic art. It was the last of these for which he’s perhaps best known, such as this interactive, immersive “Penetrable” installed in the plaza in front of the Ahmanson building at the sprawling Los Angeles County Museum of Art, or LACMA.

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WTF Awesome … The “RGB Colorspace Atlas” by Artist Tauba Auerbach

A couple of weeks ago, we stumbled upon the magnificent “RGB Colorspace Atlas” (Volumes 1, 2 & 3) by New York-based California artist Tauba Auerbach at LACMA in Los Angeles. The artwork contains paper-page cubes and a book or “atlas” of digital offset prints of all the possible color variations in the RGB color model system. The work was recently acquired by LACMA as part of its permanent collection. We’re hearting it very much.

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In NYC … Getty Gas Station Turned Into Sheep Meadow

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Fun with Chris Burden’s “1 Ton Crane Truck”

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We’ve been following the work of artist Chris Burden for a long time. We’re fans. Especially of some of his recent installation artwork like “Urban Light” LACMA and “Metropolis II” in Los Angeles, which we’ve posted about before. Burden has a new show at the New Museum in New York called “Extreme Measures,” and we’ve already gone to check it out a few times to re-experience the work (and have some photographic fun, too). The work pictured here is titled “1 Tone Crane Truck,” which is literally what you see.

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On the Scene … At the DUMBO Art Festival NYC …

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The cobblestones of Water Street in Brooklyn’s scenic DUMBO neighborhood were covered with adhesive plastic sheets, each with a personal, hand-written message as part of an installation artwork at the 2013 DUMBO Art Festival this past weekend.

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Ping Pong Game as Conceptual Sound Art …

This ping pong table installed in the second-floor terrace of the first-rate Hammer Museum in Los Angeles (and, by design, the museum-visiting couple playing) is a conceptual piece of installation sound art titled “Sound Piece for the Hammer Museum,” one of a series of projects at the museum by Machine Project. Love it.

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The Stunning and Sublime “To Fly, To Drive” by Artist Marsha Pels

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This installation artwork by American artist Marsha Pels is stunning. The work is a sculptural piece in which two angelic, winged dogs made of translucent resin are illuminated from within and in the shown in the midst of ascending into the air while dragging a car engine behind them. This is one of most beautiful, sublime things we’ve seen in a very long time. The work is on view at the Parker’s Box gallery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York.

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Contemporary Chinese Art … Liu Chuang’s “Love Stories”

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We love this recent artwork titled “Love Stories” by young Chinese artist Liu Chuang. The installation consists of a table stacked with worn copies of Chinese romantic pulp-fiction paperback books that were once part of a lending library. The photos here show the artwork as it appeared as part of the Shanghai-based Leo Xu Projects gallery space at the Frieze Art Fair New York earlier this year. – VC

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The “Ctrl Alt Del” Project

Israeli artist Yossi Wallner’s viral street art project “Ctrl Alt Del” is one of the coolest projects and cleverer ideas we’ve seen in a while. Wallner has taken the common keys used in laptops and computer keyboards and installed these as buttons on walls, columns, and public infrastructure in his home city of Tel Aviv, in Israel. See photos below.

The re-contextualization of these familiar keyboard components, with their abbreviated function labels (Del, Esc, Wake, Power, etc.), imbue these objects with multiple meanings when in the public space, whether on a telephone pole, next to a security camera, in a leafy park or on a busy street.

What’s more, in these settings the buttons suggest some new kind of functionality whereby we can shape parts of the real world outside by pressing the same keys we use to change the words in an email or re-touch an image in Photoshop. Wallner poses the questions “What if the keyboards that we are buried in blindly all day could change your reality? If you could escape something by a push of an “Esc” button? Delete anything by a flick of a finger?”

The Tel Aviv installations are the first for this project, and Wallner is planning to create a website and a community of collaborators to put up keyboard buttons in cities around the world and submit photos of their installations to his site. We’d love nothing more that to walk down a street in Tokyo or New York a year from now and find one of his “Esc” keys on a wall.

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Yossi Wallner Images. All rights reserved.

“The 2000 Sculpture” by Walter de Maria at the Resnick Pavillion, Los Angeles

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We’re fans of artist Walter de Maria and his massive abstract, geometric sculptural installation artworks. This one at the always reliable and first-rate Los Angeles Country Museums of Art, a.k.a., LACMA, is an epic work that fills a warehouse-size gallery in the museum’s Resnick Pavillion.

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