Tag Archives: artwork

DECK THE WALLS: SKATEBOARDS AS DECOR – THE HORROR!

There’s really no excuse for this. Unless it’s a college dormitory or your parents’ basement or the living room of a pro skater or the place of business for somebody connected to the skateboarding industry (and by extension the surf industry), skateboards as decorative wall art is no bueno, brah!

You see, savvy reader, once you’re past a certain age and a certain living circumstance (i.e., you’ve moved out of your college dorm room or parents’ basement into your own apartment or one-bedroom condo) your choice of decor and artwork should show that you’re adulting, and we mean adulting hard!

You should be hanging some real artwork on your walls. If you have a spare $450 million lying around for a rare Leonardo da Vinci painting, well, that would be a good start. But you’re practical — you don’t throw around that kind of money on a painting (which is possibly a fake anway) even if you have that kind of money.

Think more along the lines of some tasteful framed black and white photography. Or a framed Shepard Fairey poster or a signed and numbered Mr. Brainwash print. Even framed covers of vintage 1970s Playboy or New Yorker magazines is acceptable.

But skateboard decks! No! If you’re Tony Hawk, then it’s ok. Are you Tony Hawk? No, you’re not (unless, of course, you are Tony Hawk — Tony, is that you? Are you reading our blog? — OMG, Tony, you’re so awesome, bro!!!).

If you’re Banzai Bowls, a fine establishment and purveyor of smoothies and açaí bowls in the picturesque seaside hamlet of San Clemente, California, then it’s also acceptable to hang skateboard decks on you walls (see photos above and below).

Banzai Bowls can do it because they’re part of the surf-skate culture and San Clemente is a serious surf-skate town, if not the modern American surf-culture capital.

 

SIDE HUSTLES: WE LIKE TO SKETCH

Yes, it’s true, savvy reader. Sometimes we here at Global Graphica like to pick up a pen, pencil or, preferably, a Sharpie and make little drawings of things, everyday objects, people, faces, and so on. We have a habit of making sketches of surfboards and surfers riding waves, as in the example pictured here. And we do so in our Moleskine notebook or on any available paper surface. In the case of the surfer in the sketch above, we drew that on a paper tablecloth while dining out and killing time as we waited for post-dinner dessert to arrive.

HOBBIES: WHERE TO PUT THAT $450 MILLION DA VINCI PAINTING YOU JUST BOUGHT AT AUCTION

Leonardo da Vinci’s painting “Christ the Savior” has just sold at auction for a record $450 million. Just to clarify, savvy reader, that’s $450 MILLION, i.e., nearly HALF A BILLION DOLLARS! For a painting. So, you know, a bargain, right? We mean … what’s the fuss?

The painting, pictured above in a photo appearing with a New York Times article, has been called “the male Mona Lisa.” Continue reading

PINKISH: PORTRAIT OF ROBED ELEPHANT-HUMAN STREET ART BEFUDDLES PASSERSBY

Street art often provides many unanswered questions, not only about the artwork itself, but also who created it. There’s seldom clear authorship for most street art and usually no contextual information about the artwork or artist in the way there is for in a museum of gallery. That can make it difficult to attribute the artist or read the artwork, though that’s also part of the allure of street art.

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CONFUSION: “ART-NOT-ART” STREET ART

A funny thing about “art.” Sometimes the happiest of aesthetic accidents happen as a consequence of totally non-artistic impulses.

Take as prima facie example the case of the roller-shutter pictured above. It’s on a warehouse-factory building in the rapidly gentrifying Downtown Los Angeles neighborhood dubbed the Arts District. It’s a beautiful building, a grand structure standing as testament to L.A.’s glorious former industrial past.

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BREAKING NEWS UPDATE: NEW MAYA HAYUK MURAL IN NYC COMPLETED

Aaaaaaaaaaand … it is done. As breathlessly reported here earlier artist Maya Hayuk had started work on a new mural in New York City and had posted a photo of the work in progress.

We just learned that her new mural has now been completed and the artist has posted a photo (below) of the new artwork on her socials.  

The precise location of Maya’s new mural was a bit of a mystery, but we can now confirm that it is in a space at the new Google Flatiron pop-up at 5th Avenue and 16th Street in NYC’s Flatiron neighborhood.

Ok. That is all. Now back to your regularly scheduled weekend.

CULT OF KAWAII: WHEN STREET ART “GETS CUTE” WE ALL SUFFER

 

Look, savvy reader! Look at the photo above!

See that tiny wheat-pasted street artwork of a poodle-like canine waltzing down the pavement seeming to give zero fucks but in a totally oblivious, entitled way?

Ahhhhh …. cuuuuuuuuute, right?!?!? 

Look again, look carefully. Is that a dollop of poop nonchalantly emanating from the butt of this kawaii canine? It is! It must be! Wow, this cartoon pup really does give zero fucks.

Ahhhhh …. cuuuuuuuuute, right?

Well, we’re not buying it. This is just a little too cute (or as Japanese high-school girls love to squeal: Kawaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii”). And frankly this is even a little too cute for the Los Angeles Arts District where this pic was snapped.

Sure, the poop is a touch of insouciance and whimsy we can appreciate here at Global Graphica. Clearly this artwork was something not executed without thought. (Notice how that dollop of poop has its own shadow!!!!)

And we like how the artwork was posted at the eye level of a small rodent. (The artwork actually is the size of a small rodent — less than a foot long. It shows that the artist is, as corporate HR specialists like to say, “detail oriented.”

That aside, this kind of cuteness is too easy and a kind of artistic crutch. We want our street art to be bolder, grittier, heavier, more epic, aesthetically nuanced and more serious about message.

What is this artwork trying to say? Pick up your dog’s shit? That everybody has to poop, even the most beautiful and haughty little bitches? (For the record, the word “bitches” is used here in the scientific sense to mean “gender-female dog,” and not used in the often misogynistic hip-hop sense).

With this kind of cute, we suffer. You, us, everybody — even the artist — suffers. Yes, the struggle is real.