Tag Archives: artist

COLOR LOVER: THE SUPER-RAD MURALS OF ALBERONERO

We’ve never heard of Alberonero. Have you? No? We didn’t think so. But now we have, and you have, too. And we’re all the better for it.

The artist’s building-scale abstract murals play with color palettes and geometric forms. These create the effect of colorful pixelation on the urban landscape.

Born in Lodi, Italy, Alberonero studied interior design at Milan Polytechnic. But his first foray into painting was through graffiti art as a teenager. Check out more of the Alberonero’s work on the artist’s website.

HAVE WE REACHED “PEAK” YAYOI KUSAMA?

We saw this cool street-artsy mural portrait of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama in Santa Barbara, California, while visiting there this past Monday. Kusama is a major international art star who has blown up the past few years as blockbuster exhibitions of her artwork and installations have popped up in art museums around the world and collaborations with brands like Louis Vuitton have made her work more visible to a broader, global audience. That said, we were a bit surprised to see her portrait in a town like Santa Barbara. Which got us wondering, in 2018 have we reached “peak” Kusama? The answer is, yes. Maybe. If not this year, then perhaps next.

YOU’RE SO RETRO: 8-BIT IMAGES OF YOUR FAVORITE PEAK TV-ERA SHOWS

Artist Gustavo Viselner is a so-called “pixel artist,” and he’s brilliant. The artist has made a name for himself by creating retro videogame-style 8-bit images of memorable scenes from some of the most popular television programs of the U.S. peak-TV era, a.k.a., the current “golden age” of more quality TV shows than a person has time to watch. These include images from shows like “Breaking Bad” and “Stranger Things.” More images on his website.

ADVENTURES IN NEON: HOW “DOUBLE AMERICA 2” IS THE PERFECTLY SYMBOLIC ARTWORK FOR THE TRUMP ERA

Artist Glenn Ligon‘s “Double America 2” is among the most profound works of contemporary American art, and it is profoundly American. It’s absolutely brilliant.

The artwork can read on several levels. At its core is the idea of there being two different Americas or American experiences largely due to race, and, more pointedly, to racism, discrimination and its place in the nation’s history.

It points to the psychology of identity, the sense of black and white, rich and poor, haves and have-nots, exterior image and interior reality, something bright — and brightly lit — and ideal versus something gravely wrong, upside down, dark and flickering.

We’ve seen this artwork several times over the years elsewhere in museums around the U.S. and the world. We recently viewed it at the Broad Museum in Los Angeles (pictured here). It’s the first time we’ve seen Ligon’s artwork since the U.S. Presidential campaign and election of Donald Trump, an event that brought the startling breadth of the nation’s cultural, economic, racial and political divides into the sharpest focus. 

“Double America 2” seems a perfectly pointed and symbolic visual meme for the times, for the condition of the United States in the politically divisive, ugly “Trump Era.”

RADICAL: ARTIST SELF-PORTRAIT REVEALS POSSIBLE IDENTITY CRISIS

When you hear the words “self-portrait” you think painting or image by an artist or photographer of him or her self. In modern parlance, that’s a selfie, if you will.

It’s straightforward. A picture … of your self, by your self. Usually, there’s just one of you. It’s pretty narrowly defined.

Unless you’re the Venezuelan artist who goes by the name Marisol, who has recently blown our mind with her sculptural artwork titled “Self-Portrait.” Back in the ancient times of the late 1960s she created a three-dimensional selfie in wood that expresses seven versions of herself. Yes, SEVEN!

Now you, savvy reader, may be thinking what we’re all thinking here now, that this reveals some fucked-up shit. You may be right about that or you may be completely wrong.

You may be formulating an off-the-cuff interpretation that the artwork is telling you the artist had an identity crisis of some sort. You may be right. Or not.

You may be thinking, “What kind of wood is that? That wood is beautiful! Can I find that type of wood at a Home Depot?” And, ok, sure, whatever, that’s fine. 

Marisol’s wood sculpture may well indeed be a self-portrait of a troubled mind or an expression of multiple identities. But aren’t we all at any given moment just revealing one facet of the many versions of our inherently complicated human selves? 

Marisol’s artwork brilliantly gives us pause for thought, perhaps even grave concern coupled with a heady stew of awe and wonderment. Perhaps it even raises questions we never thought we’d ask, like Does our healthcare plan cover the cost of professional counseling? (And, if so, what’s the co-pay?)”

But seriously, that all said, real mental health issues are nothing to joke about.

Back to the artwork at hand. In an interesting twist, three of the depictions of Marisol’s face are close representations of the artist’s actual likeness, and in this way capture various states of her real physical appearance.

The other “portraits” are mysterious, weird, more deeply subject to interpretation and disturbing, and a little grotesque. These look nothing like the artist but instead suggest a more complicated expression of her intention, her personality and state of mind.

The sculpture could also be interpreted as a catalog of roles the artist plays or roles that have been assigned to her by a society and culture at the time that could be seen as more patriarchal and chauvinistic than it is today.

“Self-Portrait” is on view as one of hundreds of artworks by various Latin American women artists at the Hammer Museum called “Radical Woman: Latin American Art, 1960-1985.”

Like with all great artwork, “Self-Portrait” makes the viewer ask questions and search for answers we may never know. We become more curious. In trying to understand what it all means, we look for context, we want to know about the artist, her experiences, her points of view and background. We look for patterns and clues in her other works.

So who is Marisol? She may be one of the most important pop artists you’ve never heard of. Her full name was Marisol Esobar, and she passed away in 2016 while living in New York City. She’s included in the Hammer exhibition as a Latina artist, but she was born in France to Venezuelan parents who spent many years in Europe, traveling frequently there and in the U.S. and Venezuela before settling in the States.

Reading her biography, two things stand out about her background. One, her parents died while Marisol was still a child. She eventually spent most of her formative teenage years at boarding schools in New York and Los Angeles. The second thing is that she was a deeply religious Catholic. 

No doubt these experiences informed her body of work over a career that spanned six decades.

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ロサンゼルスのハンマー美術館でベネズエラのアーティストMarisol Escobarによる木彫り。アートワークのタイトルは「セルフポートレート」です。アートワークは、1960年から1985年の間にラテンアメリカの女性が作ったアートワークの展示品です。

Magdalena Fernandez Exhibition at MoCA Pacific Design Center … West Hollywood, Los Angeles

The small, self-titled exhibition of video and installation artwork by Venezuelan artist Magdalena Fernandez at MOCA Pacific Design Center in Los Angeles is one of the more exciting art shows we’ve seen in 2015. It’s a sublime little exhibition that sucks you into a mesmerized, contemplative state.

An artist known for her modernist abstraction, “Magdalena Fernandez” includes six projected graphical animation videos on the museum’s walls and floor and a site-spicific light installation that seems to hover over stairs that connect the first- and second-floor galleries. Her work incorporates audio recordings of birds chirping, and these are synced to the choreography of her animated graphics. Go see it.


  
  

Artwork by Lily Ludlow at Canada Gallery New York

We recently visited the Canada Gallery in the Lower East Side to check out artist Lily Ludlow’s show titled “Pereidolia.” The exhibition includes a collection of her recent abstract paintings and an installation piece made of long strung-out tree branches that fill an entire gallery. Good stuff.

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Street Art by Calen Blake in New York

Fresh street art by artist Calen Blake on the old Bowery Bank building, a.k.a., the Jay Maisel Building, at the corner of Bowery and Spring streets in New York’s Lower East Side. This wheat-paste artwork is yet another portrait of a woman with an intriguing body of hair — it’s a densely packed school of small fish.

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Contemporary Art … British Artist Chris Ofili’s Infamous Elephant Dung Sculpture in View in New York

Amid the many paintings by British artist Chris Ofili currently on view at the New Museum in New York is this amusing, visceral little sculpture tucked away in a small stairwell nook. The piece is titled “Shithead” and is made from the artist’s hair, teeth and elephant dung. (Shit, literally.) The artwork is part of an imposing career-survey exhibition of Ofili’s work called “Night and Day.”

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On the Scene … “H-Edge” by Cecil Balmond at the Ferragamo Museum

“H-Edge” is a super cool stainless steel sculpture by British-based designer Cecil Balmond installed a few days ago in the piazza in front of the Salvatore Ferragamo Museum and flagship store in Florence (Firenze), Italy. The artwork is part of an exhibition with the Ferragamo, and its installation coincides with a number of art events and the Pitti Uomo mens fashion trade show in Firenze the same week.

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“Infinity Nets” by Yayoi Kusama at Frieze NY

Yayoi Kusama is one of Japan’s foremost modern and contemporary artists, and it’s been a treat to witness her re-emergence over the past 15 years and her evolution into a global art star whose minimalist creative vision has resonated with so many art fans, collectors, and curators worldwide. Pictured here is one of her abstract, monochromatic “Infinity Nets” paintings.

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