Category Archives: Urban Life

OUR RE-MASTERED “SEA OF FOG” RELEASED WITH NEW ARTWORK! AVAILABLE NOW!

As part of Global Graphica’s ongoing electronic music project Aloha Death, we’ve released a re-mastered version of our first tune, “Sea of Fog.” We’ve released it with new art work too! You can stream or download on Apple Music / iTunes, Spotify, YouTube and almost everywhere now! Or listen now via the link below!

A MADMAN RETIRES: THE MAN BEHIND APPLE’S ICONIC COMMERCIALS CALLS IT QUITS!

Lee Clow announced his retirement last week. Who? What? Who again? Ok, so you might not know his name  — It’s not a household name, but if you work in the advertising or marketing world, and especially in an advertising agency and have done your homework or have a passion for creativity, then you will have heard of him.

For nearly five decades, Clow was the creative force at a global ad agency called TWBA. And he was the visionary behind Apple’s iconic commercials and ad campaigns, including a Super Bowl ad often cited as one of the greatest TV spots of all time known. The ad is often referred to as “1984” and it first introduced the Mac. 

Clow is a self-described pirate, and he was a product of Los Angeles’s counter-cultural surf culture. He was a surfer and to this day the TBWA agency’s sprawling L.A. office is decorated with dozens upon dozens of surfboards. His rebel worldview shaped his approach to advertising and creativity.

MINIMALISM FOR $95,000.00!


This small smoked-glass cube by artist Larry Bell is a classic of minimalism. And now it can be yours for a mere $95K. The cube is a signature of Bell’s body of work, though much smaller than most of his cubes on display in almost every significant museum collection of post-modern art. This one titled “SMBKWDEN #6” recently was on view at the Pete Blake Gallery at Art Los Angeles Contemporary 2019.


GO GET ‘EM TIGER! FEROCIOUS FELINE STALKS URBAN JUNGLE!

This street art mural of a tiger in Los Angeles is cleverly placed behind two dumpsters. The effect is of the tiger crouching, hiding behind the trash bins, ready to pounce, as if surreptitiously stalking prey. Photo by the incomparable art director and musician Raymond Hwang (@raymadethat on Instagram).

RESPECT THE HUSTLE

Mr. D. At the agency office in Los Angeles with another one of his awesome typographic tee shirt. This one reads: “Demand the impossible, Respect the hustle, Keep it 100.”

STYLE ICON & DESIGNER KARL LAGERFELD DIES

We woke this Tuesday morning to the news of the passing of a fashion legend. Karl Lagerfeld died after being admitted to a Paris hopsital Monday night. He was 85, and until recently still hard at work at the helm of several luxury clothing brands, most notably the legendary French brand Chanel.

Lagerfeld was a giant of style and the global fashion business. His influence and imprint can’t be overstated. In the 1980’s he took over the design and creative stewardship of Chanel. As a result of his tenure, the storied fashion house went through a reinvention and emerged as one of the leading and most profitable luxury fashion brands in the world.

To the general public and the world outside high-fashion’s tight-knit community, Lagerfeld might have been a mystery. At a distance, his image appeared to fit with the stereotypical “crazy” fashion industry and media and its pantheon of eccentric characters and style freaks. But Lagerfeld had an uncompromising aesthetic vision of style that transcended mere clothing. 

If you haven’t seen it, we highly recommend the 2007 documentary film “Lagerfeld Confidential.” The movie is fascinating and revealing, and provides a behind-the-scenes-like glimpse into the Lagerfeld’s rarefied lifestyle, as well as the inner workings of the fashion business.

The man was an icon in the surest sense of the word. As the New York Times reported in its obituary, Lagerfeld once said “I would like to be a one-man multinational fashion phenomenon.” He was precisely that.


UNVEILED! A NEWER MoMA TO RE-OPEN IN FALL 2019!

The Museum of Modern Art in New York is set to close for four months starting in June for the completion if its final phase of renovations. The museum will have spent about $400,000,000 on the changes, which includes the incorporation of adjacent properties with the main museum building. It’s not just architectural change that’s happening. The renovations will also bring changes to the way artworks are presented in the galleries — and where — and the on-view collection itself.