Monthly Archives: December 2016

Crisp Street Art

Epic new artwork by Crisp on a fence in the alley behind Abbot Kinney Blvd. in Venice, Los Angeles. There’s a series of large-format street art pieces along this back-alley fence. Each segment of the fence has an indivudual artwork. What’s unusual about these is that the artwork itself is on a tarp-like material sized and tied to the sgement of chainlink fence. You can find these on the block between Santa Clara and California avenues.

Entrance to MOCA / Geffen Contemporary 

We’re not religious. But museums are our cathedrals, our churches and temples, our shrines. MoMA may be the modern art world’s Vatican, but in terms of pure open space, MoCA’s Geffen Contemporary in Los Angeles comes closest to a giant cathedral like Notre Dame with its massive, cavernous structure. We’re not saying that this museum is equivalent to Notre Dame as far as degree of architectural achievement and historical significance. We’re saying that it is a big fucking space and one that invites reflection and a kind of awe.

The Geffen was kind of a happy accident. The building wasn’t purpose built to be a contemporary art museum. The structure is in LIttle Tokyo in Downtown LA and was originally built in the 1940s for the city as a warehouse and LA Police Department garage accommodating hundreds of vehicles. At the time, MoCA’s use of the space was purely practical.

While the main landmark MoCA branch was being built on nearby Grand Avenue in the early 1980s, the warehouse/garage in Little Tokyo was used as a temporary exhibition space dubbed the “Temporary Contemporary.” Its purpose was to host art shows until construction of the new main MoCA would be completed. The acquisition of the building made sense. The Temporary Contemporary was a success.

It was repurposed as a permanent exhibition space and extension of MoCA. Architect Frank Gehry led the effort. The Geffen’s location is walking distance to the main MoCA location in Downtown LA, and the former LAPD garage offers the kind of space that allows for sprawling exhibitions and epic, large-scale sculptural artworks and installations that might be more diffciult or impossible to mount in other museums. 

What Would Kanye Think?

WWKT? What would Kanye think? We’ve recently been seeing a lot of these wheat-pasted WWKT posters around town. The one pictured here was on construction hoarding along Abbott Kinney Blvd. in Venice, in Los Angeles. The question is In the vein of “What would Jesus do?” In this case, it’s Yeezus.

So what If we actually take the question posed in this hilarious poster seriously and spend a few minutes ruminating on it, what might out answer(s) be?  What would Kanye think?

First, with regards to the poster and question itself, Kanye being Kanye, he’d probably have something to say about it for the sake of saying something about it and the chance to get some attention. Otherwise, he couldn’t care less. He wouldn’y think about it all. Maybe he’d feel flattered. A mild ego stroke.

WWKT about Donald Trump? He’d think Trump was great and, had he voted, would have voted for Trump. But Yeezus didn’t vote election day.

All the many things that one might want to know what Kanye is thinking about … Well, it’s endless.

WWKT about Greek yogurt? WWKT about the news Star Wars film, Rogue One? WWKT about getting for Kim Xmas present? WWKT the latest song by the Chainsmokers? WWKT about bicycle lanes? About who will win the Super Bowl? About climate change? About cilantro? Charter schools? Solange?  The Electoral College? Brexit? 

New JGoldcrown “Lovewall”

Here’s yet another beautiful “Lovewall”(a.k.a., “Bleeding Hearts”) mural by British street art rockstar JGoldcrown. This one is new and on the wall behind the Groundwork Coffee cafe at the corner of Montana Avenue and 16th Street in Santa Monica, in Los Angeles. 

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この壁画のタイトルは「ラブウォール」(「愛の壁」)です。 それはロサンゼルスのサンタモニカにあるアーティストJ Goldcrownによって作成されました。

 

The Amazing Drawings of Toba Khedoori

The artwork of Australian-Iraqi artist Toba Khedoori leaves a distinct impression. Her works are primarily finely detailed, photo-realistic pencil drawings in monochromatic lead or color on massive sheets of waxed paper. The drawings tend to be focused on discrete, single objects set in a vast emptiness — a chair, a fence, a door — or a piece removed from its larger architectural context — rows and rows of seats from a theater or, as in the example pictured here, a fireplace. It’s one of a series of drawings of fireplaces currently on view as part of her solo show at LACMA in Los Angeles. The drawing has a trompe l’oeil quality but has none of the cheap gimmickry of that anachronistic decorative conceit. Looking at the drawing from afar, it appears as if there’s an actual fireplace recessed into the gallery wall.

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これらの大きくて、詳細で、現実的な図面は、オーストラリア – イラクの芸術家トバ・ケドゥリ氏によるものです。 これらはロサンゼルスのLACMAで展示されています。

Monrow at Dusk

The clothing brand Monrow will soon be opening a retail concept store in this tiny, old California-style bungalow near Venice Beach in Los Angeles. As standard retail practice, the windows of the house-turned-shop are covered with paper to provide privacy while the final interior build-out is being completed. The Monrow signage is up and the lights are on, so the brand has announced itself in the neighborhood. It will be interesting to see what the company does with the space.

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ここにファッションブランドのモンローの新しいショップがあります。 この店は、ロサンゼルスのヴェネツィア近所の古い家を占有しています。

Street Art as Office Decor

We recently went to a series of meetings at a creative agency in Southern California. The walls of the conference room where the meetings were held were covered in wheat-paste street art. Most of the artwork was boldly illustrated black-and-white poster cut-outs of hand-drawn graphics in a comic style. Our favorite was a large graphic of a masked Mexican “lucha libre”-style wrestler. The artwork gave the conference room a lot of energy and a sense of fun, while showcasing the tastes of the company’s creative team. 

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この会議室は、カリフォルニアの広告代理店にあります。 会議室はストリートアートで装飾されています。

Muhammad Ali Mural

This powerful street art mural in Venice, Los Angeles depicts late boxing legend Muhamed Ali. The image is based on a photo of Ali and references the famous 1974 “Rumble in the Jungle” boxing match he fought. The match was held in Zaire (now Congo), where local supporters cheered Ali with the Lingala phrase “Ali bomaye!” which is written on the wall in red paint.

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この壁画は、有名なボクサー、ムハメド・アリを描いています。 アートワークはロサンゼルスのヴェネツィア地区にあります。

Surf Photography Books

On a recent visit to the Arcana bookstore in Culver City, in Los Angeles, we checked out some beautiful coffee-table books on surfing and surf photography. Among these was a book titled “Surfing San Onofre to Point Dume: 1936-1942.” It’s a collection of sepia-toned photos by Don James documenting his surfing experience and his surfer friends and their lifestyle in Southern California during the pre-World War II era and early war years. The photos reveal what the surfing life was like in its first idyllic golden age when the Hawaiian “sport of kings” was still novel and taking root in California.

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これらのクールで美しい本は、サーフィン撮影に関するものです。 これらの本は、ロサンゼルスのカルバーシティにある有名なアルカナ書店で見つけました。