Monthly Archives: January 2006

“Waystr” Graf on Lower East Side Truck

delancey_graf_truck_498.jpg

“Waystr” appears on at least three or four different trucks that operate out of Chinatown and the Lower East Side of downtown Manhattan. In each case, “Waystr” is rendered in different colors. Here the writer has upped his massive tag in blue and white hues. Look for it when your in New York City.

Ivan Corsa Photo

NYC Artist Flower Guys Makes New York Mag Cover

new_york_mag_cover.jpg

In a special double issue that hit stands last week, New York Magazine published a feature under the teaser “123 Reasons to Love New York Right Now.” It’s, as they say, a keeper. But what we really love about this issue is the magazine cover. There’s a photo of a street artist painting a massive line-drawing of a flower.

The flower image is instantly recognizable to New Yorkers, especially downtowners, and anybody who follows street art. The artist is known generally as “Flower Guy.” His real name is Michael De Feo, an artist whose work has been exhibited worldwide. De Feo is also the author of “Alphabet City,” one of several books on street art recently published in the U.S.

De Feo’s flowers have become icons within NYC. Flower Guy’s work can be found as massive paintings that appear on sides of tenement buildings and lofts (like the one on the New York cover) and as small wheat-paste posters on post boxes and the bases of lamp posts.

According to British author and graphic designer Tristan Manco in “Street Logos,” his ever reliable book on street art around the world, De Feo started creating stencils of moons, flowers and safety pins around downtown New York City in the early 1990’s, but locked onto the flower image while experimenting with a paint brush.

In a cheeky touch, the New York mag editors list De Feo as reason “NO. 124.” (the cover teaser, as noted above says “123”). Love it.

Street Art on Berlin Wall in New York City 1

berlinwall_nyc_3.jpg

When the Berlin wall fell in 1989, its pieces — its concerete bits, chunks and slabs — ended up as so many souvenirs and art objet for collectors, museums and public urban installations all over the world. The Berlin wall was a long, massive canvas for sreet artists and graffiti writers. Covered in layer upon layer of scrawls, imagery, paint and political messages, the wall was like lonr-running (literally) communal, open-source work of of public art on the West Berlin side. Viewed out of its context far away from Berlin, a slab of the wall functions as a stand-alone piece of art that is a legitimate subject of aesthetic consideration. And it also functions as a historical artifact that reminds viewers of one of the uglier 20 geo-political events of the 20th Century.

New Yorkers have their own slab of the Berlin wall in Midtown Manhattan. This image shows an actual segment of the Cold War barrier on public view behind real-estate developer Jerry Speyer’s office building at 520 Madison Avenue. To get to it, you need to access a small, open plaza on the north side of 53rd Street between 5th and Madison avenues. Check it.

Ivan Corsa Photo

Street Art on Berlin Wall in New York City 2

berlinwall_nyc_1.jpg

Here’s a detail shot of the Belrin wall sgement in Midtown, New York City. The most prominent imagery is that of an illustrated face.

Background

When the Berlin wall fell in 1989, its pieces — its concerete bits, chunks and slabs — ended up as so many souvenirs and art objet for collectors, museums and public urban installations all over the world. The Berlin wall was a long, massive canvas for sreet artists and graffiti writers. Covered in layer upon layer of scrawls, imagery, paint and political messages, the wall was like lonr-running (literally) communal, open-source work of of public art on the West Berlin side. Viewed out of its context far away from Berlin, a slab of the wall functions as a stand-alone piece of art that is a legitimate subject of aesthetic consideration. And it also functions as a historical artifact that reminds viewers of one of the uglier 20 geo-political events of the 20th Century.

New Yorkers have their own slab of the Berlin wall in Midtown Manhattan. This image shows an actual segment of the Cold War barrier on public view behind real-estate developer Jerry Speyer’s office building at 520 Madison Avenue. To get to it, you need to access a small, open plaza on the north side of E. 53rd Street between 5th and Madison avenues. Check it.

Ivan Corsa Photo

Street Art on Berlin Wall in New York City 3

berlinwall_nyc_2.jpg

Here’s another shot of the Berlin wall slab in NewYork that shows a tourist inspecting the wall. This image was taken from an angle and looks out toward E. 53rd Street.

Background

When the Berlin wall fell in 1989, its pieces — its concerete bits, chunks and slabs — ended up as so many souvenirs and art objet for collectors, museums and public urban installations all over the world. The Berlin wall was a long, massive canvas for sreet artists and graffiti writers. Covered in layer upon layer of scrawls, imagery, paint and political messages, the wall was like lonr-running (literally) communal, open-source work of of public art on the West Berlin side. Viewed out of its context far away from Berlin, a slab of the wall functions as a stand-alone piece of art that is a legitimate subject of aesthetic consideration. And it also functions as a historical artifact that reminds viewers of one of the uglier 20 geo-political events of the 20th Century.

New Yorkers have their own slab of the Berlin wall in Midtown Manhattan. This image shows an actual segment of the Cold War barrier on public view behind real-estate developer Jerry Speyer’s office building at 520 Madison Avenue. To get to it, you need to access a small, open plaza on the north side of E. 53rd Street between 5th and Madison avenues. Check it.

Ivan Corsa Photo

Paris: “X” Mural at Swiss Cultural Center

paris_swisscenter_498.jpg

We love this massive “X” on these freight doors outside the Swiss Cultural Center in the trendy Les Marais district of Paris. The Swiss Cultural Center is kind of a hidden gem; the center is in a beautiful, post-modern multi-level exhibition space at the end of a narrow alley. The cneter is home to frequently changing art shows featuring work by young artists and designers. The alley, through which one pust pass to reach the center, is filled with great street art and graf.

Ivan Corsa Photo

Paris is My Baghdad

parisismybaghdad_498.jpg

This phrase has greater resonance in light of recent riots in the suburbs of Paris and other cities throughout France, as well as ongoing events in Iraq. We found this phrase sprayed in English and Arabic on the asphalt outside the entrance to the Swiss cutural center’s art gallery in Les Marais in Paris.

Ivan Corsa Photo

Happy New Year!

“Happy New Year!” from the Global Graphica massive to all of our readers, contributors and friends around the world! Big up and best in 2006!