Monthly Archives: January 2006

New Yorker Cover Paste-Up by Momo at 11 Spring St. – #1

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Once again, the street artist Momo strikes the building at 11 Spring St., in Nolita, New York City. This wheat-paste is a sweet tongue-in-cheek poster. The black-and-white work is of a fictional New Yorker magazine cover depicting Momo in the act of pasting up his (her?) work. Brilliant, fresh stuff.

Ivan Corsa Photo

New Yorker Cover Paste-Up by Momo at 11 Spring St. – #2 Detail

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Detail of the new Momo paste-up at 11 Spring St. in downtown Manhattan.

Background Note
Once again, the street artist Momo strikes the building at 11 Spring St., in Nolita, New York City. This wheat-paste is a sweet tongue-in-cheek poster. The black-and-white work is of a fictional New Yorker magazine cover depicting Momo in the act of pasting up his (her?) work. Brilliant, fresh stuff.

Ivan Corsa Photo

CORRECTION: Neckface Twerps! “Lobster Roll” Sticker, NYC – Detail

neckface_detail.jpg

CORRECTION: The artist who created this sticker was misidentified in our original post below. The work featured in the detail image above is Twerps! “Lobster Roll” sticker. We apologize to the artist and our readers for the error. (Props to Mikhail in NYC for setting us straight.)

2006-04-24

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A detail of a recent Neckface sticker in Soho, NYC.

Background Note
The work of Neckface is among the most familiar array of street-art images in lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, New York City. Neckface works in several mediums and is known for stickers and wall pieces featuring creepy characters who have little if any neck (hence the apt name “Neckface”). Neckface also often simply scrawls his name in large child-like lettering on the sides of buildings and other urban surfaces. But it is for his stickers that he is probably best known. These can be found in many major cities, including NYC, San Francisco and Tokyo. The Brooklyn-based artist is oringally from California. He has exhibited his work in galleries throughout the world and has had his art (and himself) featured in magazines and newspapers.

Gear: Nikon Coolpix 3600 Digital Camera

Ivan Corsa Photo

CORRECTION: Neckface Twerps! “Lobster Roll” Sticker, NYC – Context

neckface_context.jpg

CORRECTION: The artist who created this sticker was misidentified in our original post below. The work featured in the image above is a “Lobster Roll” sticker by “Twerps!” We apologize to the artist and our readers for the error. (Props to Mikhail in NYC for setting us straight.)

2006-04-24

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Here’s the wider, contextual shot of a recent Neckface sticker in Soho, NYC.

Background Note
The work of Neckface is among the most familiar array of street-art images in lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, New York City. Neckface works in several mediums and is known for stickers and wall pieces featuring creepy characters who have little if any neck (hence the apt name “Neckface”). Neckface also often simply scrawls his name in large child-like lettering on the sides of buildings and other urban surfaces. But it is for his stickers that he is probably best known. These can be found in many major cities, including NYC, San Francisco and Tokyo. The Brooklyn-based artist is originally from California. He has exhibited his work in galleries throughout the world and has had his art (and himself) featured in magazines and newspapers.

Gear: Nikon Coolpix 3600 Digital Camera

Ivan Corsa Photo

Street Artist Swoon Hits Rivington St. – No. 1

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Here’s a color image of the new Rivington St. work by street artist Swoon. The photo was shot at night, hence the yellow-orange tint to the image.

Background Note
There’s some fresh work by the artist Swoon on Rivington St., between Bowery and Chrystie, in that interzone between Nolita/Soho and the Lower East Side of Manhattan. The Brooklyn-based Swoon is our favorite New York street artist. This work, which depicts an African-American boy with first pumped, continues Swoon’s series of life-size cut-out wheat-paste images of people engaged in everyday activities on the streets of the city.

Ivan Corsa Photo

Street Artist Swoon Hit Rivington St. – No. 2

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There’s some fresh work by the artist Swoon on Rivington St., between Bowery and Chrystie, in that interzone between Nolita/Soho and the Lower East Side of Manhattan. The Brooklyn-based Swoon is our favorite New York street artist. This work, which depicts an African-American boy with first pumped, continues Swoon’s series of life-size cut-out wheat-paste images of people engaged in everyday activities on the streets of the city.

Ivan Corsa Photo

Ludlow St. Art, Lower East Side, NYC 1

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Above is the closer-up detail photo of the some Lower East Side street art.

Background Note
Ludlow St., that increasingly high-rent and noisy tenement canyon in the booming Lower East Side of New York City, is home to lots of graf and street art. Pictured here is an acrylic painting on wood affixed to a light post on Ludlow between Stanton and Rivington streets. The image is a profile portrait of a man whose face in made of metal or steel like some kind of comic book cyborg hipster. “Curls” is signed twice on the image. We don’t know if that’s the signature of the artist or the scrawl of some third-party passersby. In the rapidly gentrifying LES, where talk these days is sometimes as much about condos, apartment sales and real estate than it is art and music, it’s great to see that street art is still alive and well in the nabe.

Ivan Corsa Photo